CCIA Calls for More Openness in Cloud Openness Plan

BY CCIA Staff
March 30, 2009

As an organization that has advocated for open markets, open systems and open networks for 38 years, the Computer & Communications Industry Association appreciates a recent effort to get agreement on openness in the growing area of cloud computing. If cloud computing is the next stage in the development of the Internet, openness will be important.

But news reports indicate some of the main players in cloud computing were not involved in helping draft IBM’s Cloud Computing Manifesto and several key companies are now not signing on as a result of the politics surrounding the document.

“We find it ironic that the first document espousing openness in cloud computing was not drafted in a spirit of openness,” said CCIA President & CEO Ed Black. “The principles outlined in this cloud computing manifesto are a good start and the concept is too important to get derailed by distrust over how the document was drafted.

“It probably doesn’t help that the company leading this effort, IBM, doesn’t apply its vision of openness to how it wields is power in the mainframe market, where it has a monopoly. We welcome this document and hope it is a sign IBM supports openness as a growing part of its business model.

“We simply ask that IBM practice what it preaches. In its Open Cloud Manifesto, IBM espouses the principals of choice and openness and says companies should ‘not use their market position to lock customers into their particular platforms.’ However, over the past decade IBM has engaged in a pattern of behavior designed to keep its customer base locked-in and deny those who rely on the mainframe choice. When it comes to true beliefs on openness, it’s too soon to tell whether IBM is really a convert, but we can hope they’ve found religion.”

“The Open Cloud Manifesto contains many good ideas and a commitment to openness is a positive sign for the future of a free and open Internet. We would ask all companies involved to work together and with us to ensure the openness of cloud computing.”

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