Google’s New Trademark Policy: Pro-Consumer, More Aligned With Industry Standards

BY CCIA Staff
May 15, 2009

Google has announced it would be changing its policy regarding certain uses of trademarks in the text of sponsored search results. The policy change will permit greater use of trademarked terms in advertisements by advertisers such resellers and objective review sites. In response to the announced change, the following statements may be attributed to Computer & Communications Industry Association counsel Matthew Schruers:

“This policy change is pro-consumer, and in fact aligns Google’s policy more closely with current industry standards on sponsored search text.”

“By allowing ad text to make references to others’ trademarks – a practice permitted and encouraged by trademark law – Google’s new policy will improve consumers’ ability to find products online, and to obtain better information about the products they want to buy.”

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