CCIA Praises WIPO Copyright Developments, Expresses Concern About Secret ACTA Negotiations

BY CCIA Staff
December 15, 2009

Brussels — On the occasion of the 19th session of the World Intellectual Property Organization’s (WIPO) Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) in Geneva, the Computer & Communications Industry Association applauds the parties’ commitment to developing international intellectual property norms in an open and transparent manner.

CCIA specifically commends the U.S. Government’s statement that it does not share the view that “any international consensus on substantive limitations and exceptions to copyright law would weaken international copyright law.” CCIA further commends the Administration’s statement saying, “The United States is committed to both better exceptions in copyright law and better enforcement of copyright law. Indeed, as we work with countries to establish consensus on proper, basic exceptions within copyright law, we will ask countries to work with us to improve the enforcement of copyright. This is part and parcel of a balanced international system of intellectual property.”

The following comments can be attributed to Erika Mann, who served as a member of the European Parliament until 2009 and worked on IP issues. Mann will be directing CCIA’s Brussels office, which will open in January:

“As we learn more details about what may be in the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, it appears as though this treaty is not consistent with the commitment to a balanced approach to copyright expressed during the WIPO meeting. More transparency would help us determine whether the measures being negotiated really represent the greatest good for all stakeholders and citizens who would be impacted by the new rules. It is unclear whether those at the table for the negotiations are seeking to balance the value of ensuring artists receive fair compensation for their work with the value of fair use and other exceptions that encourage innovation. We would encourage them to seek this balance and allow others to see what they are preparing, if they are indeed confident that ACTA is good public policy.”

 

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