CCIA To Release Economic Study Calculating Value of “Fair Use”

BY CCIA Staff
April 26, 2010

Industries that rely on fair use exceptions to copyright law grew faster than the rest of the U.S. economy according to a new study to be released on Capitol Hill Tuesday.

The 2010 economic study “Fair Use in the U.S. Economy” found that industries relying on fair use and other exceptions to copyright make up one-sixth of the U.S. economy and employ one of every eight workers. The study comes on the heels of a GAO report that found the numbers in the studies used by those advocating crackdowns on copyright infringement didn’t add up.

The Computer & Communications Industry Association commissioned the study conducted using publicly available government data and World Intellectual Property Organization methodology. The report updates a comprehensive 2007 study that shows the importance of fair use.

The following can be attributed to CCIA President & CEO Ed Black:

“In a knowledge-based economy, having numbers that show why fair use matters is critical as legislation is made and trade agreements are negotiated. Fair use is critical to the innovation economy. Much of the unprecedented growth of the tech and communications industry can be credited to the fair use doctrine. This cornerstone that fosters creativity and innovation must be protected.

“These numbers could help those weighing the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement understand that ACTA is not a trade agreement, but an antitrade agreement for US industry. A better understanding of the costs of overzealous copyright enforcement should help policymakers make sure new rules, legislation and agreements protect rightsholders as well as innovation.

“This study further underscores why trying to persuade other nations to replicate only part of our copyright system in an unbalanced way will wind up boomeranging on the most dynamic, creative and innovative sectors of our economy.”

The study will be released at 12:30 pm at the Cannon House Office Building April 27th at an event featuring remarks by Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif. and the economists who have authored the study.

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