CCIA Media Briefing Call with Antitrust Experts on The FTC’s Closure of the Google Case

BY CCIA Staff
January 3, 2013

With the news that the Federal Trade Commission has closed its antitrust investigations of Google, the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) is convening a panel of experts to discuss the outcome of the 20-month investigation. Our panel of legal experts will discuss the core issues that were examined by the FTC as part of their investigation as well as the implications of the announcement for future innovation and competition in the fast evolving high tech market.

Moderator:

Ed Black, President & CEO of the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA)

Speakers:

Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law and well-known patent and standardization expert.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law at Santa Clara University School of Law and director of the school’s High Tech Law Institute.

Glenn Manishin, Partner at Troutman Sanders, he represented several competitive software trade associations in the United States v. Microsoft case.

When: Thursday, January 3, 2:15 p.m. EDT

Conference Call Info:

Participant Dial-In Number(s): (877) 375-9151

Conference ID # 85923659

Questions: For any questions, please contact CCIA’s Director of Media Relations, Heather Greenfield (hgreenfield@ccianet.org202-783-0070 ext. 113)

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