State of the Net Conference Opens; CCIA Speaks On Telecom Panel Today

BY CCIA Staff
January 22, 2013

Computer & Communications Industry Association Vice President Cathy Sloan will be part of a telecommunications panel discussion at 11:30am at the State of the Net conference sponsored by the Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee at the Capitol Hyatt today. The panelists including author Larry Downes, Corie Wright of Netflix and University of Pennsylvania law school professor Christopher Yoo asks “Should Congress Rewrite the Telecom Act?”

Sloan, who was a telecom attorney who helped advise Congress on the 1996 law says that first we’d have to focus on what’s broken that the FCC, as the expert agency for both wired and wireless telecommunications, cannot remedy on its own.

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