FCC Wireless Bureau Approves T-Mobile, Metro PCS Deal

March 12, 2013

The FCC’s Wireless Bureau has approved T-Mobile’s merger with Metro PCS, saying the deal would benefit the public interest with better choices for mobile broadband.

The following can be attributed to Computer & Communications Industry Association President & CEO Ed Black:

“For the millions of Americans who rely on mobile devices to access the Internet, this merger means more competition and the improved access and pricing that come with it.”

The following can be attributed to CCIA Vice President Cathy Sloan:

“This is an encouraging and a sensible step toward more competition in the wireless broadband marketplace. Independent and disruptive mobile phone companies need to aggregate spectrum and become stronger in order to innovate and compete against the two dominant carriers. This transaction reflects real progress in that regard.”

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