CCIA, Trade Associations Ask Congress For Patent Reform

BY CCIA Staff
July 17, 2013

CCIA joined dozens of trade associations from the American Bankers Association to the National Retail Federation to NCTA asking House and Senate leaders to pass comprehensive legislation aimed at patent trolls. In the letter Wednesday morning, those harmed by patent trolls told lawmakers that since 2005, the number of defendants targeted by patent trolls has quadrupled and that this activity cost the US economy $80 billion in 2011.

The letter praises legislative solutions pending in the House and Senate Judiciary Committees along with Chairman Leahy and Chairman Goodlatte as well as President Obama for his executive actions to slow down those abusing the patent system. For more on the letter, click here. For CCIA patent counsel Matt Levy’s blog post at Patent Progress, click here.

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