House GOP Can Demonstrate Governing Party Capability through Immigration Reform

BY CCIA Staff
November 1, 2013

Comprehensive immigration reform has been on hold in the U.S. House of Representatives since the summer, having been sidelined as Congress grappled first with the Syria situation and then the government shutdown/debt ceiling confrontation.  With the budget and debt issues having been resolved (at least for a few months), we look forward to renewed engagement in the House on immigration reform.  Of course, there remain significant obstacles to be dealt with before that can happen, chief of them the fact that a consensus has yet to be reached within the Republican caucus on how to proceed.  However, immigration reform is an issue too important to be shunted aside, and a governing party cannot avoid having a thorough internal debate to decide what its own solution to the problem is to be.

Immigration reform is an issue central to the future prosperity of the U.S. as a nation.  It is an issue of economic competitiveness in an increasingly globalized economy and of utilizing human resources in a way that maximizes the nation’s potential.  This week, the Bipartisan Policy Center released a study “Immigration Reform: Implications for Growth, Budget and Housing” showing that immigration reform would increase economic growth and reduce the deficit.  Skilled immigration reform that enables U.S. technology companies to have access to foreign-born workers and entrepreneurs would end the current policy of unilateral disarmament in the global competition for talent.  Yet, as Congress seems to lurch from one crisis to the next, the ongoing crisis of a broken immigration system is left to fester like an open wound.  This cannot continue.

We understand that immigration reform is a difficult issue for House Republicans to address, with diverse opinions existing within the caucus.  However, a governing party (or a party that seeks to be seen as ready, willing and able to govern) does not have the luxury of picking and choosing only those issues that are convenient.  To govern is to deal with all problems that the nation confronts.  Of course, this does not mean they must support any kind of immigration reform.  House Republicans have made clear that they cannot support the Senate reform bill.  They must now come up with a House Republican version of reform that they can support.  That effort is well under way in the form of their piecemeal legislative approach.  Whether that approach comes to fruition through House passage of the kind of immigration reform that most Republicans can support will signify whether the party is a governing party, or simply content to be in opposition.

Related Articles

CCIA Offers Comments in Response to the FTC and DOJ’s Request for Information on Merger Enforcement

Apr 20, 2022

Washington – The Computer & Communications Industry Association told the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice that the current merger guidelines provide clear practical guidance on when a transaction is likely to raise competition concerns, and that creating sector specific rules would lead to more confusion for companies and courts. The comments filed today…

Economic Study Finds Congressional Antitrust Bills to Cost Consumers, Business Users $319 Billion

Mar 22, 2022

Washington — A comprehensive economic study by National Economic Research Associates (NERA) finds that proposed antitrust legislation in Congress could cost the economy $319 billion. The result would be increased costs and loss of services for consumers, small businesses and other users of the bills’ target companies — Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon.  The…

CCIA Response To Senate Judiciary Committee’s Announced Markup of Bill Aimed At Handful of Companies

Jan 11, 2022

Washington —  The Senate Judiciary Committee has noticed a markup of S. 2992, the American Innovation and Choice Online Act, aimed at regulating a specific group of American digital service providers. The proposed regulation represents a shift from the market-oriented principles that have characterized U.S. economic policy. It would have a severe impact on U.S.…