U.S. Government Continues To Examine Copyright

BY Ali Sternburg
January 29, 2014

My last post described how all three branches of the U.S. government are considering copyright reform.  And they’re all still at it.

The IP Subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee has held two hearings on copyright already this year, one yesterday and one two weeks before that.  On January 14, they contemplated the Scope of Copyright Protection, and on January 28, the Scope of Fair Use.

Courts have faced a lot of copyright cases over the past year, with many diverse industries — not just technology, but also entertainment industries like film, music, theater, and the NFL — successfully relying on the fair use doctrine to be absolved from allegations of infringement.

And on the agency front, CCIA recently submitted reply comments to the PTO and NTIA, in the ongoing Green Paper process.

CCIA’s contributions to these reform conversations have focused on the contributions of limitations and exceptions like fair use to the U.S. economy, and cautioned against further expanding copyright’s scope.  We’ve also pointed out that all stakeholders need to be at the table for there to be effective and meaningful reform, whether it be the absence of notice-and-takedown enforcement vendors in conversations about the DMCA, or the absence of the technology industry in conversations about fair use, a doctrine upon which the industry heavily relies.

Related Articles

Copyright Office Releases Study On Safe Harbors, Recommends Further Reviews

May 21, 2020

Washington — The Copyright Office released its study today on how copyright provisions within the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act are being used. The study does not recommend wholesale changes to the Section 512 safe harbor system, but identifies areas where Congress may want to step in with legislation. The Computer & Communications Industry Association…

France’s new hate speech law risks excessive takedowns, harms freedom of expression

May 13, 2020

Brussels, BELGIUM — The French National Assembly today adopted its “Avia Law” aimed at combating hate speech online. The Computer & Communications Industry Association is concerned that it could lead to excessive takedowns of content as companies, especially startups, would err on the side of caution.  The new law requires platforms to takedown manifestly illegal…

USTR Releases Notorious Markets Report

Apr 29, 2020

Washington —  The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative released its annual Notorious Markets Report identifying online and physical marketplaces that reportedly engage in and facilitate piracy and counterfeiting. USTR also released the 2020 Special 301 Report.  The Computer & Communications Industry Association is an international trade association which has members that enforce policies aimed…