CCIA Files FCC Comments Noting Lack Of Competition, Need To Preserve Open Internet

BY Heather Greenfield
September 15, 2014

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association filed comments with the FCC today that offer additional legal arguments in support of preserving Open Internet access and respond to other comments that misstate or ignore the power of local network bottlenecks in broadband Internet access.  In its filing in July, CCIA offered detailed recommendations on the best legal and policy framework to protect Americans’ access to content – to include no-blocking and no-discrimination rules.

The following can be attributed to CCIA President & CEO Ed Black:

“The Internet slowdown last week led to thousands of calls to Congress and another deluge of FCC comments supporting Open Internet rules and freedom against Internet restrictions.  We hope policymakers not only listen to this rising chorus, but take action that preserves the Open Internet and leads to a crescendo of innovation.

“This record number of FCC comments shows clear backing for drafting clear, strong, and enforceable rules to save the Open Internet and prevent Internet access providers from acting as gatekeepers of online content for their consumer and small business subscribers. ”

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