CCIA Responds To Copyright Office’s Music Licensing Report: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

BY Heather Greenfield
February 5, 2015

Washington — The Copyright Office has issued a report on music licensing today, taking a commendable position on the need for transparency in the extremely complicated music marketplace, but also recommending the repeal of statutory provisions that have enabled the modern digital music revolution.

The Computer & Communications Industry Association filed comments with the Copyright Office in September, emphasizing the need for transparency and weighing in on Copyright Office questions such as the consequences of publishers withdrawing licenses for musical works from services like ASCAP and BMI.

The following statement can be attributed to CCIA VP for Law & Policy, Matt Schruers:

“While it is commendable that the Copyright Office acknowledges that transparency in the music marketplace is essential to ending inefficiency and abuse, many of its recommendations would put at risk the licensing structure and platforms that play music legally and compensate music creators.

“Policies that would unfairly discriminate against digital technologies and further consolidate market power among a few dominant rightsholder corporations will injure innovation, artists, and listeners alike.”

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