CCIA Urges Senate to Improve Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act

BY CCIA Staff
October 15, 2015

Washington — The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) (S. 754) is again due for consideration in the Senate in the coming weeks.  The bill primarily aims to facilitate the timely sharing of cyber threat indicators between and among the private sector and government, with the goal of improving overall domestic Internet and infrastructure security.  The Computer & Communications Industry Association fully supports that goal.

However, CCIA is unable to support CISA as it is currently written. CISA’s prescribed mechanism for sharing of cyber threat information does not sufficiently protect users’ privacy or appropriately limit the permissible uses of information shared with the government.  In addition, the bill authorizes entities to employ network defense measures that might cause collateral harm to the systems of innocent third parties.

It is important to note that while appropriately constructed cybersecurity information sharing legislation can provide a more efficient regime for the voluntary sharing of appropriately limited information between the private sector and government, it is not the only means through which information sharing can occur.  Current legal authorities permit companies to share cyber threat indicators with the government where necessary to protect their rights and the rights of their users, and should not be discounted as useful existing mechanisms.

Still, CCIA recognizes the goal of seeking to develop a more robust system through which the government and private sector can readily share data about emerging threats.  But such a system should not come at the expense of users’ privacy, need not be used for purposes unrelated to cybersecurity, and must not enable activities that might actively destabilize the infrastructure the bill aims to protect.

CCIA looks forward to working with Congress to improve CISA and other related cybersecurity information sharing bills, with the hope that a limited and efficient voluntary information sharing regime, with robust privacy protections and use restrictions, will result.

Related Articles

New EU Cybersecurity Rules Should Promote Security Mitigation, Avoid Compliance Red Tape

Dec 16, 2020

Brussels, BELGIUM — The European Commission published today a legislative proposal to update the 2016 Network and Information Security Directive.  The proposal aims to reduce regulatory inconsistencies across the EU’s internal market and it encourages security information sharing to help companies effectively address future cybersecurity risks. But the proposal also suggests that cloud computing providers,…

CCIA Offers European Commission Comments On Data Transfer Method

Dec 11, 2020

CCIA submitted comments to the European Commission on the draft new Standard Contractual Clauses (‘SCC’) to transfer data outside of the EU. CCIA believes this transfer tool will pave the way towards greater legal certainty for most data transfers outside the European Union. However, the tool could still be made more practical for companies to…

CCIA Applauds Senate Commerce Attention To Data Transfer Solutions

Dec 8, 2020

Washington — The Senate Commerce Committee holds its hearing “The Invalidation of the EU-US Privacy Shield and the Future of Transatlantic Data Flows,” Wednesday to examine the economic impact of the suspension of the popular data transfer framework and the U.S. government’s ongoing engagement to negotiate a new transfer system. Thousands of large and small…