CCIA, Industry Groups Ask For Better Digital Trade Terms In TiSA

BY Heather Greenfield
October 17, 2016

Washington — Ahead of negotiations this week on the Trade in Services Agreement  (TiSA), the Computer & Communications Industry Association and six other tech associations sent a letter to the United States Trade Representative to address increasing challenges to digital trade. The letter points out that “digital trade represents nearly 55 percent of U.S. services exports and has generated an annual trade surplus of over $150 billion.” It asks Ambassador Michael Froman to ensure the final agreement promotes cross border data flows, protects online and cloud companies from liability for content created by others, and prohibits data localization requirements.

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