CCIA Appeals To ITC To Reject Qualcomm’s Request To Ban Apple iPhones

BY Heather Greenfield
December 14, 2017

Washington —  Qualcomm is asking the International Trade Commission to block Apple devices from reaching the market, and the ITC is considering comments on how to handle this import ban request. Today the Computer & Communications Industry Association asked the ITC to reject Qualcomm’s request to ban the sale of Apple mobile devices that don’t use a Qualcomm processor.

CCIA told the ITC that Qualcomm’s behavior is anti-competitive and their request would harm consumers.

CCIA has advocated on open competition issues for more than 40 years. Apple is not a member of this international tech trade association. The following can be attributed to CCIA President & CEO Ed Black:

“If the ITC concedes and implements Qualcomm’s anti-competitive request, it would give Qualcomm additional leverage against Apple and drive up prices on Apple devices for consumers—and then to use the same strategy against other companies. Qualcomm is already using its dominant position to pressure competitors and tax competing products — behavior that seems to warrant investigation — and should not be handed an additional weapon.”

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