SCOTUS Upholds Tool To Combat Patent Trolls In Patent Case

BY Heather Greenfield
April 24, 2018

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association applauds the Supreme Court ruling in a patent case (Oil States vs. Greene’s Energy) that has been closely watched by the thousands of companies sued every year by those abusing the patent system. The high court found inter partes review (IPR) is constitutional. This review process has given those fighting lawsuits from patent trolls a way to petition to revoke low quality patents often used by patent trolls.

CCIA had joined a Supreme Court amicus brief for this case. The following can be attributed to CCIA President & CEO Ed Black:

“With today’s ruling in Oil States, the Supreme Court confirmed that the Patent Office has the power to double-check its own work.  The inter partes review process upheld today has made it less expensive for companies to defend themselves from abusive patent litigation and has helped strike down patents that never should have issued in the first place.”

For additional background information, please see CCIA Patent Counsel Josh Landau’s blog post when CCIA filed its amicus brief.

Related Articles

PTO Requests Comments On Changes To Make It Difficult To Challenge Weak Patents

Oct 19, 2020

Washington – The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has requested comments on making permanent changes to the system currently used to challenge weak or overly broad patents known as inter partes review.  The Computer & Communications Industry Association sent a letter to Patent and Trademark Office Director Iancu last year warning him that making it…

Supreme Court To Hear Case, Set Precedent On Interoperability For Tech Products

Oct 6, 2020

Washington — The Supreme Court will hear oral argument in a case Wednesday that has implications for much of the tech industry and the economy. The Google v. Oracle case, which has been litigated for more than a decade, could determine whether the reuse of certain program elements necessary for interoperability is an infringement of…