European Parliament Rejects Copyright Mandate

BY Heather Greenfield
July 5, 2018

Brussels, BELGIUM — The Members of the European Parliament today voted to reject the introduction of a press publishers’ right in Europe (the so-called “link tax”) and of content filtering mechanisms across a broad range of online services. Negotiations within the Parliament will now continue.

The Computer & Communications Industry Association, along with hundreds of academics, civil rights groups and the online sector has long opposed the introduction of such measures. They could harm freedom of expression, access to information, innovation and creativity. They damage European citizens’ fundamental rights and undermine platforms’ limited liability regime, a legal cornerstone of the European digital sector.

The following can be attributed to CCIA Senior Policy Manager Maud Sacquet:

“Today’s vote shows that MEPs heard the grave concerns of the online sector, civil society and academics. The Parliament has now an opportunity to adopt balanced and future-proof copyright rules, an important step to achieve a real, thriving Digital Single Market.”

For media inquiries, please contact Heather Greenfield [email protected]

 

 

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