FTC To Examine Tech Business Models, Acquisitions and Labor At October Hearings

BY Heather Greenfield
October 15, 2018

Washington — The Federal Trade Commission is holding a third round of hearings October 15-17 at George Mason University. Witnesses will weigh in on how existing regulations apply to multi-sided business models, digital economy employment and valuing mergers of digital services when the products offered to consumers are free.

The Computer & Communications Industry Association has advocated for policies that promote competition in the tech industry for more than 45 years and welcomes the hearings. CCIA offered the FTC comments on the state of antitrust and consumer protection law and enforcement.

The following can be attributed to CCIA Director of Competition Marianela López-Galdos:

“The FTC has brought in well-respected academics who represent a variety of views on everything from multi-sided business models to how to best protect consumer interests when reviewing mergers. This is an educational opportunity for all to better understand the business models that are driving the US economy. These hearings are also an opportunity for the FTC to look at the US model and how that has worked for both the economy and consumers as there is unprecedented pressure to import European regulations here.”

Related Articles

CCIA Submits Online Advertising Comments To Spanish Competition Regulators

May 24, 2019

Brussels, BELGIUM — CCIA submitted comments to the Spanish Competition Authority (CNMC) today in response to its inquiry into online advertising. The filing offered information and statistics to show competition for consumer attention, and in turn, advertising revenue, remains fierce, and that new technologies on the horizon will continue to disrupt the advertising marketplace.

FTC Wins Legal Case Against Qualcomm; CCIA Brief Supported FTC

May 22, 2019

Washington — The FTC has won its legal case against Qualcomm. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California found that Qualcomm’s licensing approach was anticompetitive.  Judge Koh’s order requires Qualcomm to license standard essential patents to other competitors, bars them from threatening to cut off chip supply, and bars them from requiring…