Google Introduces Changes to Android to Comply with Commission Competition Decision

BY Heather Greenfield
October 16, 2018

Brussels, BELGIUM — While Google is appealing the European Commission’s Android decision, it announced changes to contractual terms today to comply with the decision. The changes will specifically address contractual terms the Commission took issue with in its decision.

Starting later this month, phone makers will be able to license Google’s mobile application suite without licensing its Search and Chrome applications. Separately, Google is also allowing its partner device makers to market so-called “Android forks” alongside devices that run on compatible versions of the Android operating systems.

The changes are aimed at keeping Google compliant while the Android appeal works its way through the European court system. The court would decide whether the Commission was correct in ignoring competition from Apple’s iOS handsets in its decision.

The following statement can be attributed to Jakob Kucharczyk, CCIA Europe Vice President, Competition & EU Regulatory Policy:

“Android has been a force for competition and innovation by offering the most open, affordable and flexible operating system in the mobile ecosystem. Today’s changes attempt to protect the Android ecosystem while also complying with the Commission’s decision.”

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