CCIA expresses serious concerns with Russia law to control Internet

BY Heather Greenfield
May 2, 2019

Washington — The Russian government has enacted legislation that will extend Russia’s authoritarian control of the Internet by taking steps to create a local Internet infrastructure, shutting out citizens from the rest of the online world.  CCIA has previously raised concerns regarding the steady rise in action by the Russia government to limit Internet freedom and shut out foreign competition.

The following can be attributed to Ed Black:

“For years we’ve seen alarming censorship measures in Russia. The legislation approved today is yet another step by the Russian government to restrict access online and artificially create borders on the Internet. We strongly encourage the international community and U.S. Administration to respond.”

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