CCIA Files Comments To Justice Department On Music Consent Decrees

BY Heather Greenfield
August 9, 2019

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association told the Department of Justice the governing system that the music marketplace relies on to obtain public performance rights is still needed. CCIA’s comments also asked the DOJ to reaffirm that licensing strategies designed to discriminate against new technologies are prohibited by two long-standing antitrust consent decrees which bind performing rights organizations (PROs).

The DOJ had sought public comments due today on the consent decrees that it put in place to govern the two biggest PROs, ASCAP and BMI. Together ASCAP and BMI control 90 percent of the market for licensing to perform music publicly in the US. 

The following can be attributed to CCIA Chief Operating Officer Matt Schruers:

“The current system promotes competition and protects businesses, rightsholders, and music consumers.  The DOJ should not weaken the system that keeps the music on for millions of listeners in stores, bars, restaurants, and other venues.  

“We continue to encourage the Justice Department to ensure that rightsholders, who coordinate marketplace activity, nevertheless offer fair terms.  Weakening these consent decrees would go against Congress’s intent, and ultimately harm all stakeholders in the music marketplace.”

Related Articles

CCIA Statement on the European Commission’s Copyright Guidelines

Jun 4, 2021

Brussels, BELGIUM — The European Commission today presented its long-awaited Guidance on the implementation of Article 17 of the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market. EU Member States have to transpose the Directive into national law by 7th June. The following can be attributed to CCIA Senior Manager, Alex Maglione: “We encourage EU…

CCIA Reacts To European Parliament’s Digital Markets Act and Digital Services Act Reports

Jun 4, 2021

Brussels, BELGIUM — Two Members of the European Parliament have published their draft reports on respectively the Digital Markets Act (DMA) and on the Digital Services Act (DSA) proposals. The European Commission originally presented its legislative proposals in December 2020, which will now be discussed and amended by the European Parliament and the Council of…