Tech Associations Offer Digital Trade Priorities for Biden-Harris Administration

BY Heather Greenfield
January 22, 2021

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association joined 4 other associations in a statement to the incoming Biden Administration on digital trade. This is critical at a time when some longtime trading partners are enacting new barriers to cross-border delivery of digital services and goods. Industry encourages the Biden-Harris Administration to make open, rules-based digital trade a top global economic priority.

The following can be attributed to CCIA President Matt Schruers: 

“As the Biden Administration works to strengthen relations with traditional allies, we would encourage diplomats to prioritize digital trade measures. The digital economy supports 20 million jobs in the U.S. and policymakers should strive towards a global regulatory environment that encourages innovation.”

 

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