CCIA supports robust and balanced copyright policy. While copyright protection promotes creativity by rewarding authors, musicians, and developers, over-regulation can discourage innovation and threaten competition. Copyrights must be enforced to ensure that creators of all kinds are incentivized to bring creative works to market. At the same time, copyright must remain flexible so as not to impede new technological innovation. Principles such as fair use and protections for online intermediaries under Section 512 of the DMCA ensure that copyright regulations and technological advances can coexist.

CCIA’s View:

Modernizing copyright law can facilitate innovation and the growth of the Internet economy. U.S. copyright law can be reformed to ensure more rational damages by harmonizing our copyright system with other areas of the law, where damages are proportional to the injury sustained. Copyright reform can ensure the law does not impose unreasonable barriers to licensing by new industries in favor of legacy industries.

U.S. policymakers must also ensure that the policy norms which we export in our international and trade policy reflect these goals to ensure that as U.S. businesses enter markets abroad they are not subjected to liability for products, services, and content that are lawful in the United States.

Most Recent Statements:

CCIA Signs Letter To AG On Public Performance Rights Licensing

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association and other members of the MIC (Music.Innovation.Consumers) Coalition sent a letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch today supporting “fair and efficient licensing of public performance rights for musical works, particularly in light of SESAC’s recent acquisition of the Harry Fox Agency.” The letter urges the attorney general…

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European Parliament Adopts Reda Copyright Report, Omits Amendments Harmful To Internet, Innovation

Brussels, BELGIUM — The European Parliament has adopted the “Reda report” on copyright today. The plenary vote comes several weeks after the European Parliament’s Legal Affairs committee (JURI) adopted MEP Julia Reda’s report and rejected proposed amendments to protect press publishers in ways that would have put the EU out of sync with international copyright…

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The Controversial Ancillary Copyright for Press Publishers Takes Two Big Hits

Brussels, BELGIUM – Today, news-publisher-backed legislative proposals often called “ancillary copyrights” took major blows in both Brussels and Austria. Also referred to as a ‘snippet levy’, these laws aim to make online services like search engines and news aggregators pay for the display of hyperlinks and short snippets (pieces of text). First, the European Parliament’s…

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