CCIA supports robust and balanced copyright policy. While copyright protection promotes creativity by rewarding authors, musicians, and developers, over-regulation can discourage innovation and threaten competition. Copyrights must be enforced to ensure that creators of all kinds are incentivized to bring creative works to market. At the same time, copyright must remain flexible so as not to impede new technological innovation. Principles such as fair use and protections for online intermediaries under Section 512 of the DMCA ensure that copyright regulations and technological advances can coexist.

CCIA’s View:

Modernizing copyright law can facilitate innovation and the growth of the Internet economy. U.S. copyright law can be reformed to ensure more rational damages by harmonizing our copyright system with other areas of the law, where damages are proportional to the injury sustained. Copyright reform can ensure the law does not impose unreasonable barriers to licensing by new industries in favor of legacy industries.

U.S. policymakers must also ensure that the policy norms which we export in our international and trade policy reflect these goals to ensure that as U.S. businesses enter markets abroad they are not subjected to liability for products, services, and content that are lawful in the United States.

Most Recent Statements:

Thai for Two?

What do the MPAA, the RIAA, the U.S. Congress, and the perennially human-rights-challenged Thai government have in common?  A similar taste in misguided regulations with draconian flair. In Thailand, the Computer Crimes Act holds a website operator responsible for any content posted on his or her website.  The country also has strict lèse majesté laws that make…

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SOPA Hearing Demonstrates Need For More Expertise

The Stopping Online Piracy Hearing began Wednesday morning with six witnesses  — 5 supporting the bill to hold Internet companies and other intermediaries liable for copyright infringing material on their website. The many groups opposing the overly broad, convoluted approach to reduce online copyright infringement including CCIA, CEA, NetCoalition, venture capitalists, law professors, human rights…

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Judiciary Committee Holds Lopsided SOPA Hearing Today

The House Judiciary Committee held its first hearing on broad new Internet regulations, which have been opposed by cybersecurity experts, technology and consumer electronic business associations, law professors, free speech groups, venture capitalists and Internet users. Unfortunately none of these opponents was given a seat at the lopsided hearing today. Much of the Twitter traffic…

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