CCIA supports robust and balanced copyright policy. While copyright protection promotes creativity by rewarding authors, musicians, and developers, over-regulation can discourage innovation and threaten competition. Copyrights must be enforced to ensure that creators of all kinds are incentivized to bring creative works to market. At the same time, copyright must remain flexible so as not to impede new technological innovation. Principles such as fair use and protections for online intermediaries under Section 512 of the DMCA ensure that copyright regulations and technological advances can coexist.

CCIA’s View:

Modernizing copyright law can facilitate innovation and the growth of the Internet economy. U.S. copyright law can be reformed to ensure more rational damages by harmonizing our copyright system with other areas of the law, where damages are proportional to the injury sustained. Copyright reform can ensure the law does not impose unreasonable barriers to licensing by new industries in favor of legacy industries.

U.S. policymakers must also ensure that the policy norms which we export in our international and trade policy reflect these goals to ensure that as U.S. businesses enter markets abroad they are not subjected to liability for products, services, and content that are lawful in the United States.

Most Recent Statements & Filings:

Commission Publishes New IPR Strategy

The European Commission released a broad Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) strategy today, which defines outstanding initiatives in the areas of authors’ IPRs, trademarks, designs, and geographical indications. The preliminary Directive covering orphan works was introduced today. Other topics will be introduced in the second half of the year or next year. The Computer & Communications Industry Association…

Read more

Senators Reintroduce COICA Under New Name, Same Controversial Internet Censorship Directives

Today, the blogosphere has lit up with controversy as the Bill Formerly Known As COICA was reintroduced in the Senate, sporting a new coat of paint and a freshly minted backronym: “the PROTECTIP Act.”  TechDirt, Public Knowledge, Prof. Wendy Seltzer, the Technology Liberation Front, CDT, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have all weighed in with a variety of concerns.  CCIA’s statement is here. By…

Read more

Senators Reintroduce Internet Censorship Bill Under New Name

Senators Leahy, Hatch and Grassley are reintroducing legislation, which will impose a mandate on additional industries to enforce copyright laws. Instead of COICA, the new acronym appears to sound less controversial – PROTECT IP. Like COICA, the new legislation would have the Attorney General serve court orders demanding credit card companies, ad networks and domain…

Read more