As new technologies including artificial intelligence, machine learning, and facial recognition flourish in the digital marketplace, policymakers are increasingly interested in regulating these new products and services. However, these technologies are already bringing value into consumers’ lives, and American companies must continue to have the flexibility to innovate if the United States is going to continue to lead the world in technology.

CCIA’s View:

The United States must continue to allow companies the flexibility to innovate new technologies for the benefit of consumers. Any new regulations should be risk-based, flexible, and technology-neutral. By definition, emerging technologies are still in the early stages of revealing their potential for improving the lives of consumers. Policymakers and regulators must be careful to avoid stifling innovation with regulations that would hamper the benefits that consumers are already receiving with these emerging technologies, as well as the yet unrealized future benefits.

Artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies are already a part of consumers’ daily lives. For example, machine learning is incorporated in many supply chains, making manufacturing and distributions networks more efficient, which results in lower costs and faster deliveries for consumers. Artificial intelligence and machine learning hold great potential for advancements in areas like healthcare, cybersecurity, and personalized learning. Any regulatory proposals must be careful not to preclude these exciting benefits.

As with any new technologies, emerging technologies must be developed and deployed in a responsible, ethical manner. Industry, government, and consumer advocates should work together to make sure that the next generation of emerging technologies are developed responsibly. Many companies are doing important work to make sure that their algorithms and services are free of bias and discrimination. Better data leads to more accurate outcomes, and policymakers should work to ensure that high-quality datasets are available to minimize any potential bias in emerging technologies.

Most Recent Statements & Filings:

  • News & EventsCCIA Finds Significant Omissions In Report Of Critical Infrastructure Commission Industry Should Be Concerned More About What The Commission Didn’t Say, Than What It Did(Washington, DC) — “The Commission’s vague recommendations and perceived infrastructure threat give me great cause for alarm,” said Glenn K. Davidson, executive vice president of the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA). “It makes me think the government wishes to make wholesale…
  • News & EventsCCIA: Justice Contempt Action Against Microsoft is Justified and Necessary (Washington, DC) — The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) applauds the U. S. Justice Department for identifying anti-competitive practices within the computer and communications industry and taking steps to end some of them. In this case, Justice has targeted Microsoft for requiring personal computer manufacturers to license and distribute its Internet browser, Internet Explorer — along…
  • News & EventsCCIA Endorses Ashcroft Digital Copyright Bill (Washington, DC) — Ed Black, President of the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) today pledged his support of S.1146, the “Digital Copyright and Technology Education Act” introduced by Senator John Ashcroft(R-MO). “Senator Ashcrosft’s bill pave the road to the 21st century. In a single piece of legislation he has managed to protect transmission of information on…