As new technologies including artificial intelligence, machine learning, and facial recognition flourish in the digital marketplace, policymakers are increasingly interested in regulating these new products and services. However, these technologies are already bringing value into consumers’ lives, and American companies must continue to have the flexibility to innovate if the United States is going to continue to lead the world in technology.

CCIA’s View:

The United States must continue to allow companies the flexibility to innovate new technologies for the benefit of consumers. Any new regulations should be risk-based, flexible, and technology-neutral. By definition, emerging technologies are still in the early stages of revealing their potential for improving the lives of consumers. Policymakers and regulators must be careful to avoid stifling innovation with regulations that would hamper the benefits that consumers are already receiving with these emerging technologies, as well as the yet unrealized future benefits.

Artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies are already a part of consumers’ daily lives. For example, machine learning is incorporated in many supply chains, making manufacturing and distributions networks more efficient, which results in lower costs and faster deliveries for consumers. Artificial intelligence and machine learning hold great potential for advancements in areas like healthcare, cybersecurity, and personalized learning. Any regulatory proposals must be careful not to preclude these exciting benefits.

As with any new technologies, emerging technologies must be developed and deployed in a responsible, ethical manner. Industry, government, and consumer advocates should work together to make sure that the next generation of emerging technologies are developed responsibly. Many companies are doing important work to make sure that their algorithms and services are free of bias and discrimination. Better data leads to more accurate outcomes, and policymakers should work to ensure that high-quality datasets are available to minimize any potential bias in emerging technologies.

Most Recent Statements & Filings:

  • News & EventsCCIA Urges Strong U.S.-China Trade Ties As Deadline for Renewing MFN Draws Near (Washington, D.C.) The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) today urged President Clinton to maintain strong commercial relations with China and not give in to pressures to renew China’s Most-Favored-Nation status for less than one full year. In a letter to President Clinton, CCIA President Ed Black writes, “CCIA applauds this Administration’s policy of engagement…
  • News & EventsCCIA Applauds Subcommittee Passage of Encryption Bill (Washington, DC) — The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) applauds the passage of HR 695, the “Security and Freedom through Encryption (SAFE) Act” by the House Judiciary’s Courts and Intellectual Property Subcommittee. “By passing the Goodlatte-Lofgren encryption bill, the subcommittee has cast a vote in favor of protecting the privacy of communications on the…
  • News & EventsCCIA, ViON Urge Congressional Scrutiny In Rewrite of Procurement Regulation (Washington, DC) — The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA), through its member company, ViON today expressed strong objections to the current rewrite of Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 15. In testimony before the House Committee on Small Business, ViON President Tom Frana, stated that the FAR 15 rewrite, if implemented, would severely limit the…