CCIA has long worked to ease or remove excessive export controls on high-tech products. Export controls were created during the Cold War to limit the ability of communist or rogue states to come into possession of state-of-the-art computing or other technology that could endanger our national security. However, world conditions have changed significantly. Rather than a U.S.-centric system, technological progress is now more likely to occur through collaboration with allies, and the current export control system obstructs the sharing of information. In addition, new technologies are increasingly being developed in the commercial sector, rather than the military sector.

CCIA’s View:

While CCIA strongly agrees with the need to protect our national security, we believe it is important to guard against measures that would unreasonably limit or burden the legitimate export business of technology companies. Practical considerations must be weighed in fashioning any of these controls. The ideal export control regime would be narrowly targeted at such exports that truly threaten our national security if obtained by adversaries, without impeding legitimate export operations. CCIA opposes broadly drawn export controls that fail to make this distinction and would unnecessarily include many technology products. In addition, we oppose unilateral U.S. export controls which would result in the ceding of markets to foreign companies whose countries have less rigorous controls. We look forward to reforms that result in regularly updated and justifiable “higher walls around fewer items.”

Most Recent Statements & Filings:

Does Competition Law Need an Update for Online Markets? Hot Topics, Trends and Perspectives in Competition Policy

On November 30, CCIA, the European Competition and Regulatory Law Review (CoRe) and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) will host a joint conference discussing some of today’s most frequently asked questions: Does competition law enforcement require an update for online markets? How well does enforcement work in internet markets and is there a need to get better at factoring…

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Industry Groups Urge European Leaders To Reevaluate Direction of EU Digital Proposals

Brussels, BELGIUM — Industry groups have sent their strongest criticism to date of the EU’s “Digital Single Market proposals” in a joint letter to European leaders ahead of the Tallinn Digital Summit on September 29.  The letter from major industry groups, representing telecoms, mobile, internet and startup companies expresses concern that the DSM proposals have…

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