CCIA has long worked to ease or remove excessive export controls on high-tech products. Export controls were created during the Cold War to limit the ability of communist or rogue states to come into possession of state-of-the-art computing or other technology that could endanger our national security. However, world conditions have changed significantly. Rather than a U.S.-centric system, technological progress is now more likely to occur through collaboration with allies, and the current export control system obstructs the sharing of information. In addition, new technologies are increasingly being developed in the commercial sector, rather than the military sector.

CCIA’s View:

While CCIA strongly agrees with the need to protect our national security, we believe it is important to guard against measures that would unreasonably limit or burden the legitimate export business of technology companies. Practical considerations must be weighed in fashioning any of these controls. The ideal export control regime would be narrowly targeted at such exports that truly threaten our national security if obtained by adversaries, without impeding legitimate export operations. CCIA opposes broadly drawn export controls that fail to make this distinction and would unnecessarily include many technology products. In addition, we oppose unilateral U.S. export controls which would result in the ceding of markets to foreign companies whose countries have less rigorous controls. We look forward to reforms that result in regularly updated and justifiable “higher walls around fewer items.”

Most Recent Statements & Filings:

Tech Associations Offer Recommendations Ahead of Next Audiovisual Reform Negotiations

Brussels, BELGIUM — In advance of the next Trilogue meeting on a proposal for an Audio-Visual Media Services Directive (“AVMSD”), tech associations including the  Computer & Communications Industry Association, Digital Europe, EDiMA, EMOTA and EuroISPA sent a joint-letter, raising critical issues to be addressed for the AVMSD to allow for growth within the European audiovisual…

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Tech Associations Offer Recommendations Ahead of G-7 Digital Ministers Meeting

Brussels, BELGIUM — In advance of the G-7 ICT ministerial meeting on September 26-27 in Turin, Italy, technology and communications industry groups issued a joint statement  recommending policies on issues like privacy, security and data flows that would also boost innovation and jobs. The G-7 is an opportunity for economically successful, democratic countries to encourage…

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Advocate General at the EU Court of Justice Issues Opinion In Coty Germany Case on Online Marketplace Bans

Brussels, BELGIUM — Advocate General Nils Wahl delivered his opinion in the Coty Germany case (Case C-230/16). The case deals with contractual provisions a producer of luxury cosmetics imposed on his authorized retailer, prohibiting the latter the sale of products on open online marketplaces. The key question pending in front of the Court of Justice…

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