Electronic commerce, the Internet and computing promise new opportunities for businesses and services.  Unfortunately, Federal and State governments sometimes view the Internet and electronic commerce as a new platform for government-provided products and services for consumers in direct competition with private sector market participants.  These e-commerce ambitions by government entities are separate and distinct from e-government initiatives to digitize and modernize traditional governmental functions.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA views government efforts to launch competitive e-commerce initiatives with great trepidation. While we support government efforts to modernize operations, improve taxpayer services and utilize the tools and technologies of the Information Age, we cannot support the government as a competitor in commercial markets.  Such activity is antithetical to a successful free market and unfair to American taxpayers and shareholders of private businesses, who are forced to compete with publicly-funded government entities.

CCIA believes that the government injecting itself into the competitive software industry market with the goal of replacing private financial services will have new and far-reaching impacts, such as destabilizing competition, private investment and innovation.  The important goals of tax simplification and tax reform can be achieved without unnecessarily inserting the federal government into a new economic role currently played by the private technology sector.  Reduction of taxpayer burden can be achieved by non-monetary partnering with the private sector (through initiatives like the Free File Alliance) without reducing the essential citizen-centric and decentralized character of the U.S. voluntary compliance tax system.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA’s Response As Chairman Klobuchar Introduces Antitrust Bill

Washington — The incoming chair of the Senate antitrust subcommittee, Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., is introducing an antitrust bill Thursday according to various news reports, which proposes fundamental changes to U.S. antitrust law. The bill includes new merger regulations, funding for antitrust enforcers, the ability to issue civil fines against companies and also eliminate the need…

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CCIA Cautions Against Australian Proposal To Impose Mandatory Bargaining Code on Select U.S. Tech Firms

Washington – Australia’s Parliament is considering legislation to introduce a controversial Code of Conduct that would require certain U.S. internet companies to subsidize local news content producers by imposing obligations such as payment for links to news content.  The Computer & Communications Industry Association has advocated for access to information online for more than two…

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German Legislature Preempts EU Reforms with National Competition Law Amendments Targeting the Digital Economy

Berlin, GERMANY — Members of the German parliament voted to approve far-reaching regulations for large digital platforms today. Once signed into law, the proposal would make Germany the first jurisdiction in the EU specifically regulating market power in the digital economy. The reform introduces article 19a in the German “Act against Restraints of Competition,” setting…

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State Attorney General Announces Lawsuit Against Google

Washington — Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google aimed at Google’s advertising technology. The Computer & Communications Industry Association was founded in 1972 by companies challenging anticompetitive practices of IBM. CCIA has a history of supporting  evidence-based antitrust enforcement to prevent consumer harm. The following can be attributed to…

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