Electronic commerce, the Internet and computing promise new opportunities for businesses and services.  Unfortunately, Federal and State governments sometimes view the Internet and electronic commerce as a new platform for government-provided products and services for consumers in direct competition with private sector market participants.  These e-commerce ambitions by government entities are separate and distinct from e-government initiatives to digitize and modernize traditional governmental functions.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA views government efforts to launch competitive e-commerce initiatives with great trepidation. While we support government efforts to modernize operations, improve taxpayer services and utilize the tools and technologies of the Information Age, we cannot support the government as a competitor in commercial markets.  Such activity is antithetical to a successful free market and unfair to American taxpayers and shareholders of private businesses, who are forced to compete with publicly-funded government entities.

CCIA believes that the government injecting itself into the competitive software industry market with the goal of replacing private financial services will have new and far-reaching impacts, such as destabilizing competition, private investment and innovation.  The important goals of tax simplification and tax reform can be achieved without unnecessarily inserting the federal government into a new economic role currently played by the private technology sector.  Reduction of taxpayer burden can be achieved by non-monetary partnering with the private sector (through initiatives like the Free File Alliance) without reducing the essential citizen-centric and decentralized character of the U.S. voluntary compliance tax system.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Welcomes Slovenia’s EU Presidency, Presents Recommendations

Brussels, BELGIUM — The Computer & Communications Industry Association is offering recommendations for Europe’s digitising economy as Slovenia takes over the Presidency of the Council of the EU on 1 July. CCIA suggestions cover a variety of EU proposals, ranging from the Digital Markets Act, to the Data Act, and international data flows. The following…

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House Judiciary To Markup Bills Directing Regulators To Alter Business Models Of Some Tech Companies

Washington – The House Judiciary Committee is scheduled to markup several bills that would be a radical departure from the way the U.S. has regulated businesses. The so-called antitrust bills cover a broad range of issues and new rules that would apply to only a few tech companies but not other competitors, including some Chinese…

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Tech Association Response To House Bills Aimed At Handful of Tech Companies

Washington —  Democratic House Representatives on the House Judiciary Committee have introduced a series of interventionist bills with the aim of regulating a selected group of American digital service providers. These proposed regulations represent a shift from the market-oriented principles that have characterized U.S. economic policy. They would have a severe impact on U.S. economic…

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CCIA Reacts To European Parliament’s Digital Markets Act and Digital Services Act Reports

Brussels, BELGIUM — Two Members of the European Parliament have published their draft reports on respectively the Digital Markets Act (DMA) and on the Digital Services Act (DSA) proposals. The European Commission originally presented its legislative proposals in December 2020, which will now be discussed and amended by the European Parliament and the Council of…

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