Electronic commerce, the Internet and computing promise new opportunities for businesses and services.  Unfortunately, Federal and State governments sometimes view the Internet and electronic commerce as a new platform for government-provided products and services for consumers in direct competition with private sector market participants.  These e-commerce ambitions by government entities are separate and distinct from e-government initiatives to digitize and modernize traditional governmental functions.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA views government efforts to launch competitive e-commerce initiatives with great trepidation. While we support government efforts to modernize operations, improve taxpayer services and utilize the tools and technologies of the Information Age, we cannot support the government as a competitor in commercial markets.  Such activity is antithetical to a successful free market and unfair to American taxpayers and shareholders of private businesses, who are forced to compete with publicly-funded government entities.

CCIA believes that the government injecting itself into the competitive software industry market with the goal of replacing private financial services will have new and far-reaching impacts, such as destabilizing competition, private investment and innovation.  The important goals of tax simplification and tax reform can be achieved without unnecessarily inserting the federal government into a new economic role currently played by the private technology sector.  Reduction of taxpayer burden can be achieved by non-monetary partnering with the private sector (through initiatives like the Free File Alliance) without reducing the essential citizen-centric and decentralized character of the U.S. voluntary compliance tax system.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Response To States’ and FTC Action Regarding Facebook

The following can be attributed to Computer & Communications Industry Association President Matt Schruers: “CCIA strongly supports antitrust enforcement when consumers are harmed. However, the remedy needs to be tailored to the evidence, and not based on an artificially narrow definition of the market. Unwinding Facebook’s acquisitions of Instagram in 2012 and WhatsApp in 2014…

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House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee Proposal Calls For Competition Policy Changes That Take Aim At Tech Companies, Consumers 

Washington — House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee chairman David Cicilline has released a Democratic-only proposal targeting several popular tech companies. The recommendations include introducing amendments to the current antitrust system that would not benefit consumers.  Republicans have released a separate Report not supporting some of the most radical democratic recommendations such as mandates to structurally separate…

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CCIA Responds to Public Consultation on EU Proposal for a New Competition Tool

Brussels, BELGIUM –The Computer & Communications Industry Association offered comments on the European Commission’s public consultation on the forthcoming proposals for a new complementary tool to strengthen competition enforcement (“NCT”) today. The consultation questions cover a wide range of issues around perceived gaps in the current EU competition rules, particularly those related to what are…

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CCIA, 20 Companies, Groups Ask FTC To Pursue Rehearing Of Qualcomm Antitrust Case

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association joined 20 other companies and associations in a letter encouraging the Federal Trade Commissioners to seek en banc rehearing of its case against Qualcomm. The FTC rightly asserted in its case that Qualcomm’s licensing practices were anticompetitive, hurt rivals and enhanced their monopoly. The trial court judge…

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