Electronic commerce, the Internet and computing promise new opportunities for businesses and services.  Unfortunately, Federal and State governments sometimes view the Internet and electronic commerce as a new platform for government-provided products and services for consumers in direct competition with private sector market participants.  These e-commerce ambitions by government entities are separate and distinct from e-government initiatives to digitize and modernize traditional governmental functions.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA views government efforts to launch competitive e-commerce initiatives with great trepidation. While we support government efforts to modernize operations, improve taxpayer services and utilize the tools and technologies of the Information Age, we cannot support the government as a competitor in commercial markets.  Such activity is antithetical to a successful free market and unfair to American taxpayers and shareholders of private businesses, who are forced to compete with publicly-funded government entities.

CCIA believes that the government injecting itself into the competitive software industry market with the goal of replacing private financial services will have new and far-reaching impacts, such as destabilizing competition, private investment and innovation.  The important goals of tax simplification and tax reform can be achieved without unnecessarily inserting the federal government into a new economic role currently played by the private technology sector.  Reduction of taxpayer burden can be achieved by non-monetary partnering with the private sector (through initiatives like the Free File Alliance) without reducing the essential citizen-centric and decentralized character of the U.S. voluntary compliance tax system.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Responds To Draft Australian Regulations Aimed At US Tech Companies

Washington —  The Australian government has announced that the Australian Competition and Consumers Commission (ACCC) has released its draft Mandatory News Media Bargaining Code of Conduct that regulates digital platforms´ commercial relationships with Australian media companies. The Australian Government has decided that these new regulations will only be applicable to Google and Facebook. The Computer…

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CCIA Reacts To UK Competition and Market Authority’s Final Report On Online Platforms And Digital Advertising

Brussels, BELGIUM — The UK Competition and Markets Authority today published its final report on online platforms and digital advertising. The CMA’s recommendations would grant far-reaching powers to a new digital regulator to impose company-specific regulations, force product design changes, redistribute assets, and order the breakup of platforms. The Computer & Communications Industry Association encourages…

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CCIA Provides Input to the EU’s Future Proposals on the Digital Services Act and Competition Tools

Brussels, BELGIUM — The Computer & Communications Industry Association welcomes the opportunity to respond to the European Commission’s calls for feedback on its future Digital Services Act (internal market rules and ex-ante measures) and proposal for new competition tools. The European Commission is expected to present legislative proposals before the end of the year. CCIA…

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CCIA Offers Recommendations To Turkish Competition Authorities

Brussels, BELGIUM — CCIA submitted comments on a market study into competition and the digital economy by Rekabet Kurumu (“Rekabet”), the Turkish Competition Authority. CCIA commended Rekabet for seeking a better understanding of the legal, economic and policy challenges that arise with the digitalization of the global economy and its significance in the competition analysis.…

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CCIA Welcomes New Hires In Brussels and DC Offices

Washington/Brussels, BELGIUM  — The Computer & Communications Industry Association is announcing new hires for both its DC and Brussels offices. Kayvan Hazemi-Jebelli (Kay) joins the Brussels team as Competition & Regulatory Counsel. Vann Bentley joins CCIA’s  Washington office as Policy Counsel, focusing on issues including artificial intelligence and telecommunications policy.  Kay is a competition lawyer…

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