The U.S. technology industry has been the engine of growth for the U.S. economy.  Growth has depended on the industry’s ability to continue its rapid technological advancement to continue to come up with “the next big thing.”  The U.S. must remain the global center of innovation.  In order for the U.S. to maintain its leading role, the industry must recruit the best and the brightest minds from around the world.

CCIA’s View:

In order for U.S. companies to maintain their global competitiveness, the United States must continue to be the IQ magnet of the world.  U.S. technology companies must have continued access to the highly skilled foreign nationals who currently make up the shortfall in science and engineering students in the U.S.  This foreign talent complements, rather than competes with, the U.S. labor pool.  Many of the highly skilled foreign nationals that U.S. companies wish to hire are already here doing research at U.S. universities yet, without a sufficient and timely visa supply, they have no choice but to return home.  This irrational deportation of needed skills results in our universities having trained our own competition.  Reforming arbitrary visa quotas and streamlining the employment-based green card process will free entrepreneurial companies to compete in the global talent marketplace.  This will enable the hiring of those who have affirmatively shown their belief in the U.S. as the best place to utilize their skills while also showing their respect for the rule of law by submitting themselves to the legal immigration process.

Most Recent Statements & Filings:

Welcome Executive Action on Highly Skilled Immigrants

This week, the Department of Homeland Security announced the publication of two rules: one to extend employment authorization to spouses of certain H-1B workers, and another to enhance opportunities for highly-skilled workers by removing obstacles to their remaining in the United States.  DHS characterized these rules as “part of the Administration’s continuing commitment to attract…

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Annual H-1B Cap Reached in Less than a Week (Again)

Washington – On April 7, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that it had received enough H-1B temporary work visa petitions to hit the annual statutory cap for FY 2015, less than a week after it had begun accepting petitions on April 1.  The general cap of 65,000 and the advanced degree holder…

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