Innovation is far more than invention; it is the creation, implementation, and marketing of new processes, products, and services. Innovation contributes to productivity, economic growth, social benefits, and capacity for future innovation and growth. A wide range of policies are needed to support innovation, since successful innovation depends on people, investment, infrastructure, markets, and freedom to create and act. These many factors and lag times means that innovation policy must take a long-term perspective.

CCIA’s View:

Encouraging innovation should be a paramount policy goal in all policy domains, not just those that are traditionally linked to it, such as the funding of basic research, patents, and technology transfer. Policies should take a long-term view attuned to future innovators, rather than rewarding past innovators. The former are likely to be underrepresented, while the latter have usually reaped the benefits of innovation and are able to make their needs heard. Policies should recognize that innovation practices and patterns vary widely – especially across different industries – and that digital technology is playing a major role in enabling new forms of innovation.

 

Most Recent Statements:

CCIA Opposes Online Sales Tax Collection Bill

The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) believes that the approach taken by the Main Street Fairness Act is unwise in general and untimely given the current economic situation.  The technology industry is prepared to be a constructive player in meaningful efforts at tax reform, but requiring Internet retailers, especially small ones, to collect taxes…

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FTC Launches Antitrust Investigation Of Google

The announcement that the FTC is seeking additional information from Google confirms various news reports that it is initiating an antitrust investigation. The Computer & Communications Industry Association has been the leading technology industry advocate for strong yet balanced competition policy since its founding nearly 40 years ago. Historic antitrust rulings against IBM and AT&T…

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Supreme Court Gold Plates Low-Quality Patents

Today the Supreme Court upheld the Federal Circuit’s protective view of low-quality patents in Microsoft v. i4i.  Despite the limited review at the Patent and Trademark Office, the Court affirmed that once granted, a patent can only be invalidated by “clear and convincing evidence,” a strong presumption of validity that is especially helpful for marginal…

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