Innovation is far more than invention; it is the creation, implementation, and marketing of new processes, products, and services. Innovation contributes to productivity, economic growth, social benefits, and capacity for future innovation and growth. A wide range of policies are needed to support innovation, since successful innovation depends on people, investment, infrastructure, markets, and freedom to create and act. These many factors and lag times means that innovation policy must take a long-term perspective.

CCIA’s View:

Encouraging innovation should be a paramount policy goal in all policy domains, not just those that are traditionally linked to it, such as the funding of basic research, patents, and technology transfer. Policies should take a long-term view attuned to future innovators, rather than rewarding past innovators. The former are likely to be underrepresented, while the latter have usually reaped the benefits of innovation and are able to make their needs heard. Policies should recognize that innovation practices and patterns vary widely – especially across different industries – and that digital technology is playing a major role in enabling new forms of innovation.

 

Most Recent Statements:

Welcome

Welcome to the Innovation Policy Post, CCIA’s forum for news and debate about intellectual property issues. We will use this blog to share our thoughts, and get yours, on patent and copyright law. We’ll also highlight abuses of those laws that range from ridiculous to damaging and illustrate the need for patent reform and 21st-century…

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FTC Files Suit Against Intel for Anticompetitive Practices

After investigating allegations of anti-competitive conduct for more than a year, the Federal Trade Commission has filed suit against Intel, accusing the company of using its dominant position in the chip making market to block competitors’ products. The Computer & Communications Industry Association has been a long-standing advocate for competition in the technology marketplace for…

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CCIA and CEA Continue To Call For Balance Between Innovation and Intellectual Property Protection

Executives of content-producing companies and government officials, including Vice President Joseph Biden, met today in Washington, D.C., to discuss ongoing efforts to combat commercial content piracy. The following statements can be attributed to Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) ® and Ed Black, President and CEO of the Computer & Communications Industry…

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