The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Supports House Amendment to Protect Americans’ Browsing Data from Warrantless Collection

Washington — The House is expected to vote this week on a bipartisan amendment to H.R. 6172, the “USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020.” The amendment, brought by Representatives Lofgren (D-CA) and Davidson (R-OH), would protect Americans’ private internet browsing and search data from warrantless collection under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act. A…

Read more

Copyright Office Releases Study On Safe Harbors, Recommends Further Reviews

Washington — The Copyright Office released its study today on how copyright provisions within the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act are being used. The study does not recommend wholesale changes to the Section 512 safe harbor system, but identifies areas where Congress may want to step in with legislation. The Computer & Communications Industry Association…

Read more

CCIA Welcomes House Members’ Focus On Advancing Emerging Technologies

Washington — Several members of the House of Representatives have begun introducing bills aimed at ensuring the US remains competitive in emerging technologies like Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of Things. The bills are part of the Emerging Technology Agenda announced earlier this month by House Energy and Commerce ranking member Greg Walden, R-Ore., and…

Read more