The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

European Commission Issues Guidance On Transatlantic Data Flows, Wants Quick Agreement On New “Bulletproof” Safe Harbour

Brussels – The European Commission today issued guidance to companies after the European Court of Justice invalidated the 15 years old EU-U.S. Safe Harbour framework which EU and U.S. big and small companies depend on for transatlantic commercial data transfers. The new Communication confirms the position taken by the Article 29 Working Party, that “transatlantic…

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House Judiciary Subcommittee Examines Data Flow Policies, Other Digital Trade Barriers

Washington — House Judiciary IP & Internet subcommittee chairman Darrell Issa opened Tuesday’s hearing titled “International Data Flows: Promoting Digital Trade in the 21st Century” by saying policies blocking data flows could lead countries to other unfair trade practices like demanding source code or trade secrets.  He said restricting Internet data from flowing across national…

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UK Proposes Bill To Increase Government Surveillance

Brussels — The United Kingdom today presented the draft Investigatory Powers Bill which raises serious concerns about privacy rights and government surveillance. The bill will require Internet and social media companies and Internet Access Providers to retain “bulk collection” of large volumes of personal communications data for access by police, security services and other public…

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House Subcommittee Digs Into “Dig Once” Bill and Other Legislation to Speed Broadband Deployment

Washington – The House Energy & Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology held a hearing on October 28th titled “Breaking Down Barriers to Broadband Infrastructure Deployment.”  Internet usage is exploding, and broadband access is a national priority.  Panelists and Members of the Committee discussed various ways to speed broadband deployment, including at least six bills…

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