The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Praises President’s Support For Open Internet Via Title II

Washington – President Obama released a statement today that strongly supports the reclassification of broadband access as a telecommunications service under Title II of the Telecommunications Act. The statement comes at a key time as the FCC grapples with trying to preserve the Open Internet under stronger legal authority while facing intense political pressure from…

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New EU Cyber Security Directive should focus on protection of truly critical infrastructure

The European Parliament’s vote from March 2014 correctly improved the scope of the Network and Information Directive by focusing on truly critical infrastructure such as the energy, banking, and transport sectors.  CCIA encourages the Council to maintain the same focus in their discussions.  We support the Council’s work and welcome the Italian Presidency’s goal of…

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CCIA Joins Letter Asking Congress To Increase MLAT Funding

CCIA joined today with several other trade associations in sending a letter urging Congressional leadership to support additional funding for processes related to the United States’ many bilateral Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties. It requests that Congress provide additional resources for the DOJ offices that process foreign law enforcement requests for evidence and electronic records, which…

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