The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Congressional Internet Caucus Panel Explores Challenges Of EU's Right To Be Forgotten Ruling

Washington – Congressional staff heard the details at a panel discussion Friday of how Europe is now implementing its Right to be Forgotten rules.  The recent court ruling has generated controversy from various stakeholders because it requires search engines to delete links to information – though the information is still legally available at the original…

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Congressional Internet Caucus Panel Explores Challenges Of EU’s Right To Be Forgotten Ruling

Washington – Congressional staff heard the details at a panel discussion Friday of how Europe is now implementing its Right to be Forgotten rules.  The recent court ruling has generated controversy from various stakeholders because it requires search engines to delete links to information – though the information is still legally available at the original…

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CCIA Files Comments on Big Data and Consumer Privacy in the Internet Economy

Washington – The Department of Commerce, through the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), recently sought public comment on how the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights could support the innovation of big data while at the same time responding to its risks. CCIA filed comments on Tuesday, aiming to balance the considerable benefits of innovative big data…

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CCIA Files Comments on ASCAP, BMI Consent Decrees

Washington – As the Department of Justice Antitrust Division reviews the consent decrees governing music licensing, the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) filed comments Wednesday. CCIA asked DOJ to uphold, update and expand the consent decrees covering the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) and Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI). CCIA weighed in…

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