The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Congress, FCC To Consider Halting Paid Prioritization of Internet Traffic Delivery To Preserve Open Internet

Washington – Important issues related to Internet interconnection practices and policies have arisen anew in both Congress and the FCC. Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., and Senate Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy offered legislation Tuesday aimed at halting a growing practice that has Open Internet advocates concerned — paid prioritization of Internet traffic delivery. The legislation would…

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Court of Justice Upholds Ruling against Intel

Brussels — Intel has lost its appeal in a case finding anti-competitive abuse five years ago. The European Commission found the company had abused its dominant market position and issued its largest antitrust fine ever — 1.06 billion Euros ($1.44 billion US dollars) for offering rebates to customers on the condition they buy all x86…

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Study By MIT Professor Maps How Patent Trolls Reduce Venture Capital Investment, Provides Empirical Support For Strong Litigation Reforms

Washington – Each side in the legislative fight over patent reform has always treated equally the debate between protecting patented intellectual property and reining in abusive patent troll litigation. But a study by MIT Professor Catherine Tucker has actually quantified the tipping point at which the patent system falls out of balance in favor of abusive patent…

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CCIA’s Response to EU Taxi Strike

Brussels – Some taxi drivers have organised a strike today to disrupt European cities in protest against new competitors, particularly Uber. Uber’s application allows consumers to order a car ride from their smartphone, something previously done by dispatchers. The Computer & Communications Industry Association represents a range of technology companies from telecommunications to Internet services and has advocated for decades…

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