The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Presents Recommendations And Hosts Stakeholder Event, As EU And US Leaders Agree On Digital Cooperation

Brussels — Senior officials from the U.S. Government and the European Commission meet in Brussels today to agree on a blueprint for digital cooperation.  In advance the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) has prepared ten recommendations on how to boost our transatlantic digital economy and restore trust. The heads of the EU and U.S.…

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CCIA Welcomes The Judicial Redress Act of 2015

CCIA supports the bipartisan Judicial Redress Act of 2015 as introduced by Representatives Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and Conyers (D-MI). This Act is crucial to help restore global trust in the U.S. government and, by extension, in the U.S. tech industry which is a major contributor to U.S. exports and U.S. growth. Under existing laws, non-U.S. citizens…

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H-1B Applications Again Go to Lottery

Days after the application period opened, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has announced that the number of H-1B temporary work visa applications received already surpasses the annual statutory cap for FY 2016. The 20,000 cap for advanced degree holders was also surpassed. With the filing period now having been closed on Apr. 7,…

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MEPs, Academics, Businesses Discuss CCIA/EDiMA Internet Opportunity Study

Brussels  — Just a month after an OECD report calling on Europe to boost productivity, CCIA and EDiMA released a report illustrating untapped potential of the Internet that could do just that. Brian Williamson of Plum Consulting presented his study ahead of a panel discussions at the CCIA/EDiMA hosted event at the Residential Palace Tuesday.…

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