The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

U.S. House Subcommittee To Review Copyright Law Critical To U.S. Economy

Washington – As part of its ongoing review of U.S. copyright law, the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Internet is holding a hearing Thursday on the legal framework that supports both copyright holders and Internet service providers. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s safe harbors sought to balance access to information online with rightsholders’ request that…

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CCIA Supports STELA, But Not Anti-competitive Amendment On TV Set Top Boxes

Washington – The House Energy & Commerce Communications subcommittee will hold a hearing today to consider legislation from its chairman, Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., that would reauthorize a law setting the rules for satellite subscribers to access broadcast television. The Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act expires at the end of this year. While there…

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House Judiciary Committee to Examine Internet Sales Tax Alternatives

Washington — The House Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing Wednesday on “Exploring Alternative Solutions on the Internet Sales Tax Issue.”  The Computer & Communications Industry Association will be following this hearing with great interest, in the hopes that it will begin the substantive and in-depth discussion on Internet sales tax collection that unfortunately was…

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CCIA Deeply Concerned by Turkish Government Threat to Block Internet Services, Social Media

Brussels/Geneva —  The Computer & Communications Industry Association was, like many others, troubled to hear reports yesterday that the Government of Turkey is considering widespread additional restrictions on social media and major Internet services. This was especially concerning given that legislation passed only weeks ago put the Internet under greater governmental control through measures including…

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