The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Brussels Proposes EU Rules for Platform Workers

Brussels, BELGIUM — The European Commission presented a legislative proposal today that aims to improve the working conditions of platform workers. The Commission proposed new rules determining platform workers’ employment status; promoting transparency, fairness and accountability in algorithmic management; and improving transparency in platform work, including in cross-border situations. Based on the new rules, a…

Read more

CCIA Statement on US, EU Officials Launching Competition Policy Dialogue

Washington — A day after U.S. and EU competition officials met to launch the EU-U.S. Joint Technology Competition Policy Dialogue, U.S. Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo criticized two new European initiatives that Raimondo said unfairly target U.S. companies. Raimondo told those gathered for a U.S. Chamber of Commerce event the U.S. had “serious concerns” that Europe’s…

Read more

CCIA Joins 10 Associations In Canadian Digital Tax Letter

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association joined 10 trade associations in a letter to U.S. officials  expressing concern with Canada’s planned  digital services tax aimed at U.S. companies. The letter notes that Canada’s tax appears inconsistent with Canada’s participation in the OECD/G20 Two-Pilar Solution and its trade obligations with the United States. CCIA…

Read more

CCIA Welcomes the Council’s General Approach on the Digital Services Act, Cautions More Work Needed on the Digital Markets Act

Brussels, BELGIUM — The Computer & Communications Industry Association welcomes the general approach reached today by the EU Ministers on the digital services act (DSA), but cautions that more work is needed on the general approach agreed on the Digital Markets Act (DMA). Trilogue negotiations will start shortly thereafter for both the DMA and the…

Read more