The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Panelists Concerned NSA News Will Buoy Efforts To Control Internet

Yesterday, the Open Technology Institute at the New America Foundation put on an event: Safeguarding Human Rights in Times of Surveillance. The event featured a round table with Rebecca Mackinnon, an NAF senior research fellow, Cynthia Wong, a senior researcher at Human Rights Watch, andCarolina Rossini, the Latin American Resource Center Director at NAF. Frank La Rue, the Special Rapporteur…

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House Telecom Panel Examines FCC Legislation

At a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing Thursday on “Improving the FCC Process,” lawmakers discussed the reintroduction of H.R. 3309 and H.R. 3310, which would change various FCC processes.  The bill passed the House last year only to die in the Senate. The proposed changes were met with varying degrees of resistance from the…

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Immigration Reform in the House

With Senate passage late last month of the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act, the focus of the immigration reform effort has shifted to the House of Representatives.  While some supporters of reform called for the House to take up the Senate bill and pass it swiftly, that was never really a plausible…

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CCIA Applauds Legislation Targeting Patent Abuse

Reps. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, and Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., introduced a bipartisan bill in the House Wednesday afternoon to help mitigate the impact of lawsuits from patent trolls. The bill is H.R. 2639, The Patent Litigation and Innovation Act of 2013. This bill is noteworthy as the first bill introduced in this Congress that specifically helps innocent purchasers who…

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CCIA Welcomes Senate Passage of Comprehensive Immigration Reform

The Computer & Communications Industry Association applauds the Senate for approving S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act.  This comprehensive immigration reform measure contains provisions that increase availability of green cards and H-1B visas, enabling U.S. technology companies to hire and keep the skilled foreign workers they need to ensure that…

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