The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Celebrates 40th Anniversary

Women and the Arts on Tuesday. Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Sen. Ron Wyden and ICANN CEO Fadi Chehade spoke in between videos depicting CCIA’s 40 year history. CCIA was started by seven small to mid-sized companies who were trying to compete with IBM. Chehade said those like CCIA who are doing all they can to advocate…

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Crowdsourcing a Multi-stakeholder Global Open Internet Task Force

Internet freedom is certainly a human rights imperative, but it is also an economic one.   Last week, Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren introduced legislation to combat trade barriers that threaten the global open Internet. Along with other Congressional representatives from California, Reps Eshoo, Honda and Matsui, Lofgren proposes to create a Task Force on the Global Internet…

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FCC Wireless Bureau Approves T-Mobile, Metro PCS Deal

The FCC’s Wireless Bureau has approved T-Mobile’s merger with Metro PCS, saying the deal would benefit the public interest with better choices for mobile broadband. The following can be attributed to Computer & Communications Industry Association President & CEO Ed Black: “For the millions of Americans who rely on mobile devices to access the Internet,…

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EVENT: CCIA's 40th Anniversary Celebration

Join us on March 19th as we commemorate our proud history fighting for open markets, open systems, open networks and full, fair and open competition in the computer,telecommunications and Internet industries. Among the night’s highlights will be: a video retrospective about how CCIA came to be and how it grew to become a leading policy voice for…

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