The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Patent Troll Week in DC, NYC

The toll of patent trolls is a focus this week with the PTO hosting a software patent roundtable in New York and CCIA hosting a panel discussion on patent trolls on Capitol Hill Thursday. Earlier this month, President Obama held a Google+ hangout in which he was asked about limiting the abuse of software patents…

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What’s So Fair About the Marketplace Fairness Act?

On February 14, another version of the Marketplace Fairness Act was introduced in the House and Senate. Like its previous incarnations in past Congresses, this bill would give states the authority to require out-of-state online retailers to collect sales and use taxes on purchases made to residents of their states — regardless of physical presence…

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CCIA Opposes Marketplace Fairness Act

The Computer & Communications Industry Association continues to oppose legislation, such as the Marketplace Fairness Act introduced today, which would impose burdensome tax collecting requirements on online retailers — regardless of physical presence.  While we understand and share the desire for state and local governments to be adequately funded in these times, we believe this…

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CCIA Welcomes Introduction of Startup Act 3.0

The Computer & Communications Industry Association applauds Senators Jerry Moran, R-Kan., Mark Warner, D-Va., Chris Coons, D-Del., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo., for introducing the Startup Act 3.0, a farsighted proposal to unleash the power of U.S.-educated entrepreneurs to create jobs.  In particular, the bill’s focus on attracting and retaining entrepreneurial talent through the creation of…

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