The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Filed Comments with the Copyright Office on Orphan Works

CCIA filed comments with the Copyright Office Feb. 4th in response to their notice of inquiry on orphan works.  These comments identify statutory damages reform as a possible vehicle for mitigating the orphan works problem, pointing to recommendations made in the Association’s  2012 comments to the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator. As explained in the brief filing,  the three main sources…

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Prospects of ECPA Reform

This past Monday was Data Privacy Day and to mark the occasion CCIA CEO Ed Black posted a piece to Huffington Post on the need for reform of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which currently allows government access to email and other content stored with third parties online without the judicial protection of a warrant. That piece…

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After WCIT, A Look Ahead To the Next Internet Governance Debate

Less than two months have passed since the World Conference on International Telecommunication (WCIT) in Dubai came to a halt over a controversial vote that would have extended a UN treaty largely centered around voice telecommunications to the Internet. Critics of the proposed revisions to the International Telecommunication Regulations breathed a bit easier as 55…

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CCIA Welcomes Introduction of Immigration Innovation Act

The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) welcomes the introduction the Immigration Innovation Act today. CCIA has long promoted skilled immigration reform as critical to maintaining and strengthening the global competitiveness of U.S. companies in an increasingly innovative economy.  This bill includes such reforms as:  increasing the H-1B visa cap and making it market-flexible; exempting advanced…

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