The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Public Interest Groups, Companies Letter To FCC On Verizon Cable Deal

More transparency is needed to study the implications of the proposed Verizon cable deal. Today public interest groups, telecommunications companies and CCIA sent a letter to the FCC saying the spectrum transaction among some of the nations largest Internet access providers is a matter that needs greater transparency and the FCC needed access to redacted documents.

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Thoughts On Information Sharing As Congress Introduces Cybersecurity Bill

Last week, after much anticipation and delay, the bipartisan Senate cybersecurity legislation, S. 2105 – Cybersecurity Act of 2012, was unveiled. Though it is laudable that Congress has begun in earnest to attend to the critical cybersecurity threats that face America, there has been little debate about the how information sharing and defense of critical infrastructure…

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International Conference in The Hague: Towards Flexible Copyright?

On February 10, the Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice organized an international conference on copyright in The Hague. The conference provided Dutch decision makers with a good opportunity to share their views of future copyright policy with fellow EU Member States, academics, representatives of the entertainment and Internet industries, and other stakeholders. It was…

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Lightsquared Announcement Disappoints CCIA, Wireless Users

The FCC has revoked Lightsquared’s waiver to operate its nationwide, satellite-based broadband network. The move comes after those trying to block the system lobbied against it claiming it would interfere with GPS traffic. CCIA and others hoping for more available spectrum and more wireless broadband competition are disappointed with this setback. Federal regulatory bureaucracy and…

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