The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Senate Introduces More Online Sales Tax Legislation

The Computer & Communications Industry Association opposes the Marketplace Fairness Act, the latest bill seeking to impose burdensome state and local tax collecting requirements on online retailers — regardless of physical presence. This bill, introduced today by Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Michael Enzi, R-Wyo., is similar to Sen. Durbin’s…

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CCIA Files FCC Comments On DISH National Broadband Network

Today CCIA filed Reply Comments with the FCC Thursday advocating that DISH Network be permitted to move forward with its planned launch of a nationwide wireless broadband network. DISH’s planned terrestrial network will create meaningful, new competition in the ultra-concentrated wireless market and put 40 MHz of underutilized spectrum to use for wireless broadband services – helping…

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Study Adds To Link Between Venture Capitalist Investment, Legal Certainty On Copyright Liability For U.S. Cloud Computing Companies

A new economic study adds to evidence that more legal certainty about liability can lead to increased venture capitalist investment in a growing industry — cloud computing. Harvard Business School Professor Josh Lerner, whose research often focuses on venture capital investment and innovation, has examined the impact of the 2008 Cartoon Network v. Cablevision decision,…

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Senate Introduces Resolution Opposing More Online Sales Tax Legislation

The Computer & Communications Industry Association applauds Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and his co-sponsors, Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-NH, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-NH, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and Sen. Mark Begich, D-AK, for introducing S. Res. 309, a bipartisan resolution opposing any Congressional legislation granting state governments authority to impose new burdensome…

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